Currently reading : perspective (Maxime Buchi in discussion with Gary Warnett)

perspective (Maxime Buchi in discussion with Gary Warnett)

10 May 2013

Author : maxime-buechi

I am not the kind to publish interviews with myself, but sometimes, the need to make certain points overrides humility and slightly hypocritical swiss political-correctness. So here I post in interview that Gary Warnett””who is a friend and someone I highly admire for his intelligence and relevance””conducted. I had asked Gary if he was interested in doing it because I knew he is one of the only people able to give a coherent form to an interview touching on my numerous””and somewhat scattered””fields of activity and interest. This interview is doomed. It was meant to be published on several platforms which all fell through a way or another. Rather that giving in to bitterness or giving up on what I consider the most interesting interview I was ever the subject of, I decided to publish it myself and accept the burden of apparent egocentricity. The introduction was written by another close friend & collaborator Nick Schonberg. I want to thank Gary and Nick for the work they put in this!

””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””

The eccentric, heavily tattooed art critic Etienne Dumont describes Maxime Buchi’s output as “gesamtkunstwerk.” Coined in 1827 by German philosopher K.F.E. Trahndorff, the word translates roughly in English to total work of art, a synthesis of all arts to form a comprehensive total. One may think of modernist architect Peter Behrens as a fine example. He considered everything from structural aesthetics of buildings to the typefaces of the companies that would reside within, Buchi follows suit but with an outsiders eye. He simply turns seemingly disparate cultural products into perfect mates.

Maxime Buchi studied graphic design and typography at the Ecole Cantonale d’Art de Lausanne (ECAL). Rather than pursue the prescribed path of the professional designer, Buchi gravitated towards tattooing, apprenticing under the renowned Filip Leu, while simultaneously founding his own art project, Sang Bleu magazine. The publication explores all of Maxime’s interests, functioning as a cultural project mixing elements of art, fashion, and tattoo with a focus on finding new paths and locations for creative debate. In addition to Sang Bleu, Buchi serves as art director of Novembre, a biannual trans-disciplinary publication that acting as a social connector for various artistic practices and practitioners.

Buchi is also co-founder of B+P Swiss Typfaces, a foundry that offers bespoke typefaces and their own developed Swiss type. Their fonts are found on the pages of Wallpaper* and at the renowned Harvard Art Museum. Additionally, it is from B+P that Buchi most explicitly creates for the fashion industry. In 2010, the foundry produced logos for Damir Doma, Balenciaga, and Rick Owens. They also provided typefaces for Vogue Turkey and L’Officiel Paris. Another high profile project hit in winter 2011, when Buchi was enlisted to provide the corporate identity for the relaunched MUGLER fashion brand and act as art director of the Fall/Winter men’s campaign.

With famed stylist Nicola Formichetti at the helm, MUGLER took the fashion and tattoo connection to new heights by casting Rick Genest, a Montreal-native with full skeletal tattoo, in a central role. The campaign is an intermingling of art projects, much like Buchi’s collective artistic activities, and one that quite successfully titillates through a bold questioning of social norms. The ultimate fusion of art, fashion, and tattoo. Gesamkunstwerk. But, with contemporary street-tinged twist.

Buchi walks a tight rope of ivory tower erudition and street corner vernacular in unmatched virtuoso step. A hip-hop head (and member of the Zulu Nation) with a keen sense of human psychology, Buchi mixes high and low not to shock but to produce startlingly new graphic ideas. In conversation with Gary Warnett, the grounding of what makes the impossible so plausible in Buchi’s work is discussed and dissected to explore the definition art and the importance of viewing trap rap in terms of post-modernist verse.

GARY:
You’ve got a Gucci Mane tattoo. What incited that addition to your body?

MAXIME:
Gucci Mane as a rapper is pushing what I think is postmodern. He represents my idea of postmodernism in rap. Even before the albums he was representing something extreme and new in the same way as NWA back then. If you listen to it now, late 1980s rap was so theatrical. And then in the early 1990s, tension started building up. If you listen to NWA going into ‘The Chronic’ and if you listen to Ice Cube’s solo albums you can feel that it’s getting more and more serious.

G:
It reaches an apex around 1992.

M:
With the LA Riots.

G:
When’s the first time you saw tattooing in hip-hop? Tone Loc’s Crip tattoos were early. There were a lot of shoulder tattoos but Treach from Naughty by Nature seemed to be on forearms early.

M:
You know what? I just remembered the other day, that the first rap tattoo I remember was a French rapper from the group NTM.

G:
What was the tattoo?

M:
It was a logo that MODE2 designed.

G:
MODE2’s and Chrome Angelz’ work lends itself to a tattoo very well.

M:
MODE2 designed that logo and it was the cover of their very first single. It was a mini CD. Joey Starr had it tattooed at the top of his shoulder. You can see it in the video of ‘Le Monde De Demain.’ If I remember well, I even got it as a sticker in on of the early issue of infamous french rap fanzine ‘Get Busy,’ I am not talking about the watered-down 2000 resurrection, but about the early 90’s photocopied ones. The first copy I got ”” the one with the sticker ”” had a MODE2 illustration on the cover too. I still have it. It’s amazing. I used to think that the first rap related tattoo I was struck by was in the Warren G ‘Regulate’ CD booklet.

G:
The ‘Long Beach’ back piece?

M:
Yes. It’s so good.

G:
You grew up in Switzerland. What was the hip-hop scene like there? Is it like Germany, where people really get into things?

M:
Yes. I have a feeling that hip-hop kicked off in France and Germany as a very serious cultural thing. Switzerland came early too. Bambaata used to visit. We had the Zulu Nation, of which I was a member. Those who could were traveling to NY as if it was going to Mecca.

G:
If you can only get certain things sent over, you’re going to get serious. What got you into hip-hop?

M:
Rap. I grew up in a very political environment and my parents were very left wing.

G:
Were they bohemians?

M:

Kind of. In a Swiss way, whatever that means! They had strong values. I read ‘The Communist Manifesto’ when I was a teenager. I declared I was a communist when I was 12. Obviously, I didn’t know what it really meant, but I could understand and agreed people should generally be more equal. My grandmother was an Italian Protestant. We had that obsession with America right out of post war Italy. And also because of the hippy culture my parents were into.

G:
Did your parents have any interest in the Black Panthers?

M:
Absolutely. My parents didn’t like punk. For them it wasn’t an option. It influenced me. For them rap was that fight in America for civil rights. Obviously, they couldn’t understand the lyrics – then they might have had another opinion. They might have had an other opinion.The first rap I heard was Run DMC’s ‘Tougher Than Leather’ which was pretty hardcore. Rhythmically and lyrically it’s pretty tough. From then onwards I was only interested in things that were tough sounding.

G:
Getting a backpiece as a first tattoo is a bold move. Don’t most people end with that?

M:
In Japanese tattooing you start with your back then expand to your entire body and that’s totally how I approached it. I was totally ready for such a commitment. I had been considering my tattoo for a long time. That’s just the way I am. A backpiece is a personal and symbolic investment. It’s like having a good watch. Not a lot of people know, but those that know appreciate.

G:
Have you always been into hardcore approaches to artforms? Do you always go in feet first?

M:
Yes, usually. Ironically, for graffiti I did things the other way around. I started super young. I was 11 or 12. There was no way I could go paint trains our such. So I started doing pretty graffiti then moved onto a more “vandal” approach. I did start with tagging though. Before I even touched a spraycan, we used to go around my village and tag anything we could with a marker. But generally, I made pretty radical life-changing decisions. Like quitting university to study art and quitting working as a graphic designer to apprentice as a tattooist.

G:
What did you used to write?

M:
I started as DEAL that was my name. Some old school guys in Lausanne still call me that. like. “Hey DEAL!”

G:
Were you ever a metaller?

M:
No.

G:
That’s odd.

M:
My rock culture is non-existent. I’m really ignorant. I got into metal a little in the last five years. I can appreciate metal for its rhythmic and energetic values.

G:
Without sounding like an old hippy, there’s parallels between hip-hop and metal. Were you always into clothes?

M:
Yeah, always.

G:
Brand names, like YSL?

M:
That was one of my graffiti names.

Were you into the big Nikes?

M:
No. That’s the strange thing.

G:
With leftist parents it sounds like one thing they wouldn’t approve of.

M:
Exactly. Being a kid in the eighties, especially in an upper-middle class Swiss countryside village. I grew up in the middle of young kids with brands everywhere. Switzerland is a very wealthy place, but my parents were not well off plus coming from that left wing mentality. The whole brand thing did not fit with their culture at all. Clothes were the last thing they wanted to spend money on. They would knit the things themselves! Going to school was a shock, because I realized that the outside world was on an opposite. I felt that I couldn’t belong to the world because I was forbidden to use brands as a social acceptance thing. In reaction, it made me super brand-aware.

G:
But there was a craftsmanship and DIY in what your parents were doing.

M:
Yeah. They were all about just doing it and ecological values. Brands were a capitalistic thing for them. Even when I joined the Zulu Nation it was part of all that political legacy from my upbringing. I was a member of the city council of my town at 18, in the socialist party. I was pretty serious about it but I released that I had to find my very own way of applying these values because at the same time I couldn’t identify with an older generation and more the way they were implementing their values. I then joined non-traditional and alternative political groups – the politicized branches of squatting communities, you know what I’m talking about. That was my first experience in publishing actually. Back in the late very early noughties, we had a self-published political zine called ‘Soma.’ It took me a while to consolidate all these contradictory experiences. At aged 33, I’ve found where I stand with all these ideologies and how to behave in a somewhat coherent way.

G:
Going to Fashion Week in Paris probably wouldn’t be your parents’ thing. Would they be more annoyed by that than your tattoos?

M:
Yes and no. Yes in theory but no because they’re not 25 any more and their own lifestyles and values have evolved. They don’t fully understand my artistic life but at the same time, if I worked in advertising or marketing THAT would be something they couldn’t support. They can definitely appreciate that fashion can be beautiful and they’ve always had a respect for art.

G:
Do you see fashion as art. Is it disposable to you?

M:
My official position on Art is pretty straightforward and post-Duchamp: If something’s not made by an artist it’s not art. Fashion is just fashion. Tattooing is tattooing. From a purely theoretical point of view, tattoo is the closest that any applied or popular art has got to fine art. But as far as I’m concerned, if it’s not an artist, it’s not art.

G:
You wouldn’t consider yourself a tattoo artist then?

M:
I prefer to consider myself a tattooist. I do make tattoos which makes me a tattooist.

G:
Are there tattoo artists?

M:
My Swiss intellectual rigor makes me suspicious. But I think Scott Campbell has successfully entered the Art world coming from tattooing. For now, his tattoos are still tattoos. Maybe he’ll end up being an artist who makes tattoos. That’s up to him. Artists like Douglas Gordon or Santiago Sierra who use tattoos are making art – excellent artists making bad tattoos good art.

G:
When did you take an interest in typography? Is it in the genes of the Swiss?

M:
Probably. In Switzerland, because of the protestant influence, like in the Netherlands, abstraction is preferred to figurative form. It makes it a very fertile ground for graphic design and typography. That no-nonsense, pragmatic, modernist approach is everywhere around you in Switzerland. But then also, I guess it’s that added to my father being a journalist””we always had books and I always liked books. Then graffiti ”” words, letters. When I went to art school it was a really logical thing.

G:
How many fonts have you created over time? They fascinate me like tattooing. It’s awkward ”” notions of space.

M:
I found myself at art school – ECAL in Lausanne, Switzerland, with Ian Party. we used to be in the same graffiti crew. We immediately started creating alphabets. We’ve created dozens of fonts. As soon as we finished school. we opened our own Type Foundry called Swisstypefaces (swisstypefaces.com). Some of the fonts you find there, we designed at school!

G:
Do you have a favorite font?

M:
I think Monotype Grotesque is my favorite font.

G:
Who has used your fonts for print?

M:
We make text fonts, not fancy titling typefaces. So they’re used for “serious” purposes. We do a lot of corporate typefaces, logos for the fashion and luxury industries. But most of our fonts are used in newspapers and books and the editorial side.

G:
Which brands have used your fonts?

M:
Mugler.We’ve done a whole action pack for them. We’ve done a logo for Balenciaga, I’ve redesigned the Rick Owens logo and two complete alphabets and logos for Damir Doma and Silent. It’s been pretty amazing to see those things and say, “I did that!” We created bespoke fonts for Esquire UK (which is still in use), Vogue Turkey, Vogue Brazil…

G:
On the magazine front, do you thing the aesthetic you helped create has been re appropriated elsewhere?

M:
Of course they have. But I am careful with notions such as “appropriation” or “copy”. When you create something like ‘Sang Bleu’, it doesn’t just come out of nowhere either, so some people might have had the same idea as you at the same time. And then some people might see bits here and there without knowing where it came from. Especially with the web.

G:
There is a ‘Sang Bleu’ aesthetic though.

M:
Yeah. It’s based on a fanzine, collage, punk approach to graphic design, laced with traditional typography. And then the photographic direction.

G:
Then there’s that fetish side.

M:
Yes. On an aesthetic level, fetish coordinates glam and a certain rawness perfectly. And then obviously, it’s a topic we’re fascinated with. At first, I printed Sang Bleu in black and white was partially because I didn’t have the money to pay for color but also because I grew up reading old ‘LIFE’ magazines. And now, it’s largely printed in color, but people still think it’s Black and White! Because it has that feel.

G:
What sub-cultural magazines were you reading growing up? Were there local hip-hop fanzines?

M:
When I was growing up we had extremely limited access. The first time I saw ‘The Source’ it was probably 1994. But before that there were a couple of local graffiti and rap fanzines such as ‘Get Busy’ and ‘Tuff Times.’ I knew every word of them!

G:
It fell off by the time you discovered it. We’ve talked about the influence ‘Tougher Than Leather’ had on you, but did the album art influence you?

M:
Yeah. That and also skateboard magazines. The first cultural magazines I had access to were ‘Transworld Skateboarding Magazine’ and ‘Thrasher’ ”” they had a big impact on me visually. Then a couple of French magazines arrived too such as ‘NoWay’ which then became ‘AnyWay.’

G:
‘Thrasher’s logo is amazing. ‘Big Brother’ was a big influence from that culture too.

M:
I still have the very first issue of ‘Big Brother’. It is A5 size. It was given for free and I’m so happy that I have it.

G:
Did any board graphics from that time have an impact on you?

M:
Some but not major. Comic books and television much more so. In my early skateboard days, we had very little notion of what the “skateboard culture” was. VHS tapes of ‘Ban This’ were hard to come by. It didn’t really look like a coherent visual culture. Obviously, I used to draw Bones Brigade, BBC, Powell Peralta and Santa Cruz logos. I was obsessed by them. But not the boards themselves, except for a few legendary ones like Natas, Rob Roscop and Mark Gonzales. Later I loved the H Street logo and I cherished my Matt Hensley deck. I wish I had kept it. I had also had a very nice Danny Way board with a kind of jigsaw puzzle design full of animals. I had a revelation with the first Plan B video. I was old enough and still interested in skateboarding enough to appreciate it. I didn’t even have a video player at home! I could only watch it at my friend Mathieu’s house, but we knew it by heart from A to Z…the tricks, the soundtrack.

G:
You might copy something but it’s just in your head, if you misinterpret it I think that’s how regional scenes differ. On the tattoo front has the internet killed regional styles?

M:
There still is because implementing a style in tattoo is difficult. Any graphic design student can put out flyers with their style on it. But to get the skills to implement a style as a tattoo artist is complicated. It takes social validation and it’s and agility. What I like about tattooing is that it’s still behind in that hyper fluidity and connectivity that put me off graphic design a few years back. There still are currents and schools of thoughts.

G:
Do you like tattooing as a trade rather than something to be precious about?

M:
Tattooing is a service. It’s also an extremely complicated process of creating symbols ”” actual symbols. It’s something that art doesn’t deal with any more. At all. And graphic design doesn’t really have that power. Some brands do. Their logos, their products become symbolic of something bigger, they are not anymore pure functional objects. With a tattoo you’re creating something that has no value outside of what you’ve established with the bearer and a semi-theoretical community of people who will appreciate the bearer’s tattoo.

G:
It’s like graffiti in that sometimes the nuances can only be appreciated by those in the “trade” so to speak.

M:
There’s something extremely popular in the social sense about tattooing. Coming from a non art-savvy background I was able to appreciate that value in a craft like tattooing. Tattooing was the furthest I could go to a pure form of creativity that’s not fine art.

G:
The “legends” of the industry seem to be underground, despite the boom in interest in tattooing. Tattooing is so huge now that to see a rapper like Jay-Z without them is almost refreshing.

M:
I was watching a documentary about DJ Screw recently and none of his crew had tattoos.

G:
It seemed to be more of a gang thing.

M:
Yes, it was a gang thing but it got popular with Latin gangs early on.

G:
Have you dabbled in scarification?

M:
I considered it. But I don’t belong to any social group that gave me access to it in a way that would make sense.

G:
‘Sang Bleu’ flirts with that extremity though.

M:
We integrated elements of bod mod here and there, but when it comes to ‘Sang Bleu’ I only want to talk about things I understand. My understanding of bod mod is much better today so it’s more and more present.

G:
Why did you start making a magazine?

M:
I started it when I first came to London in 2006. It was many different circumstances together. From an editorial and conceptual point of view it was a way to bring together and articulate my different interests. Some things worked together well, some were forced, but I had the feeling people were ready for certain crossovers.

G:
Why is it such a big magazine?

M:
It’s because I can’t choose. I’m a Libra.

G:
Do you find editing hard?

M:
Yes. Partly because I don’t like disappointing people. I’ve had to learn and regulate my professional relationships. Create an ethos. Growing up where I did, I was not so well integrated and I had problems socializing. I’ve been looking for ways to help me regulate my social anxiety and things like that. For me, tattooing is the best example. It’s extremely social. People will give away so much and talk about things ”” they’ll expose themselves physically and intimately to you. It is such an incredible responsibility. You can’t just be a dude ”” it’s kind of sacred.

G:
There’s no real oath, but there’s unspoken codes.

M:
You have to. People entrust you. They go somewhere and they believe in what you do.

G:
Is there adrenaline in the action of tattooing? An error is pretty permanent.

M:
Absolutely. Adrenaline is the only thing able to contain my ADD. This is skill and it comes through technique. You have to learn the quality of a tattoo is not only its formal quality. As a young tattooist you will improve and you will evolve over a certain amount of time. You have to find the satisfaction in the action. You have to say, “Okay, formally this is not the best tattoo I’ve done, but still it makes sense in the A-Z.” A good looking tattoo can be a failure because it’s not right. If you’re tattooing day after day, you’ll contain your mood in the tattoos. There’s good days, there’s bad days. Obviously you have to refuse a tattoo if you sincerely doubt it’s right. And sometimes things don’t click on a personal level with the client. There’s a certain threshold I am never going past, even if I need that money.

G:
Do you make the call and tell people, “No. You don’t want that”?

M:
Of course. Even today someone came and I told them, “No. That’s not a good idea and I’m, not going to do it the way you want. I can do you something else, otherwise you can find someone else to do it.”

G:
Do you see more and more young people getting handpieces?

M:
Yeah.

G:
What do you make of that?

M:
I have a few different perspectives on it. Obviously I’ll try to prevent kids doing any stupid things.

G:
Do you see it as stupid?

M:
I’ll try and take a look at what’s going on in someone’s mind ”” their will power and you can never predict what having a tattoo will be like. You have to live with it like someone gave you an extra limb. You have to just live with it. I try to evaluate without judging.

G:
It’s like asking for a deformity.

M:
Absolutely. But some people have got the ability to continue to work on the meaning and sense that a tattoo makes while others don’t. But on the other hand, hand tattoos and very visible tattoos creates a new generation who will still be tattooed when they’re 40, and if they regret it they’ll have people to regret it with and that’s a natural cycle of reaction and counter reaction. Whether good or bad, it’s a movement and it’s something that makes people relate to each other.

G:
Is there a growing acceptability of knuckle ink?

M:
Of course. The more TV shows, kids and young adults with fully visible hand and neck tattoos are on there, the more it’s accepted. I realize that the rules that applied to me at 20 do not necessarily apply to kids who are 20 today. I am no one to judge what people should do with their lives, but i will always express my opinion and discuss to understand. At worse i can refuse to be involved. It’s just an ethical discipline.

G:
If you went to see an accountant and he’s looking after a lot of money, and when he goes to shake your hand, he’s got a knuckle piece, would you trust him? Does it show a lack of commitment in his trade?

M:
I would probably find this a little suspicious. But I’d give that person a chance to explain and I would probably ask around. It’s clichés and prejudices ”” my ethical point of view is that they don’t define people so you have to give people a chance to explain. People are not only what they look like, but appearances are always the manifestation of something. If we didn’t base our social relationships and behaviours on a certain amount of rules and preconceptions it would be chaos. Nowadays being tattooed doesn’t mean you’re a low life. But a great proportion getting tattooed do so because it is linked to prejudices ”” it’s part of their motivation. It would be hypocritical to pretend that it’s not there.

G:
And if a tattooist had no skin covered?

M:
The same thing again. I think you have to know what you’re selling. Just as political leaders should all live in council homes that they’re cutting budgets for or whatever. As a tattooist, I can’t advise someone or ask them to trust me when I tattoo their necks or crotches or whatever if I haven’t been there.

G:
Do you like any tattoo TV shows?

M:
I don’t watch them. I cant say. I deliberately stay away from tattoo-related media. I do keep myself updated but my ability to find information is good, so I’d be totally saturated if i gave it to tattoo media. I’d get confused and feel powerless.

G:
Do you like the idea of just getting something because it’s awesome? The TV shows are riddled with people getting ink with meanings.

M:
It’s like footballers talking about a match and if you listen to what they say, there’s no information in what they say. The value of certain things in the fact that it can’t be talked about and just exists beyond words. I feel like that with tattoos. Some things just need to be experienced and if some people could explain it, they wouldn’t be getting it. I heard that David Lynch backed out of psychoanalysis because there was a risk that he might lose his creativity. For me, tattooing is an outlet for your psychotic clashes. If you can talk about things, you don’t need to express it. It doesn’t make a tattoo any less good.

G:
It’s as if people still feel the need to apologize for getting a tattoo through justification.

M:
Yeah. Of course. It’s always very interesting to see what attitude people apply to tattoos.

G:
Do you think there’s a pissing contest of sorts between tattooists in where they get them – between toes and the armpit?

M:
Of course there is. There is a little bit of that. But I think armpit tattoos are a sexy thing.

G:
You got your tattoo there from BJ Betts.

M:
He’s something of a father figure to me! With what he does and his values, he represents what I wish I one day will be.

G:
How long have you been tattooing for?

M:
About 4 years.

G:
Do you have a specific style?

M:
I do. I’ve been heavily influenced by Filip Leu, who I apprenticed with. More for his graphic sense than his style. Then my main influences have been Thomas Hooper, Duncan X and Jondix. They all have a personal take on traditional styles in common. I have been working with Liam Sparkes for a long time now. We have started at the same time an share the aforementioned references. We really push each other to develop a new style. Something raw and subtle at the same time. We try to re-inject a certain traditional of popular culture in western tattooing. We love mediaeval iconography and naive art. Nowadays, with people like Guy Le Tattooer, Raf, Fuzi UVTPK, Duke Rile, Len Levin we feel there is a real movement of people relating and developing this approach. It is amazing. Its real.

G:
What’s the situation with ‘Novembre’ magazine? Why did you start that project?

M:
‘Novembre’ was simply a complement to ‘Sang Bleu’. I still wanted to frontally touch on fashion and contemporary art in a more journalistic manner. Unlike ‘Sang Bleu’, it is meant to be full on media playing by the rules of traditional publishing, but obviously, offering a very contemporary and personal perspective.

G:
Instagram seems to be the social media outlet for tattooists.

M:
Yes. It’s perfect for tattooists. You have that real time thing. You can get an idea of a tattooist’s work day by day. You can develop an empathy with the tattooist as a person. It is deceiving though, for a good tattoo is not necessarily photogenic. Tumblr and instagram are still perfect media for tattoos and tattooists. It’s funny, there is such an abundance of images now. Some old school people think it’s pretentious to show your work like this day after day, but I think not editing them is a way of being humble.

G:
The Rick Genest thing was something you brokered. Was that a post ‘Sang Bleu’ action?

M:
Totally. It’s interesting. When Nicola got in touch to work on Mugler, he was buying into the ‘Sang Bleu’ aesthetic. I worked on the identity. It was a partnership. He was very open about wanting to do something like ‘Sang Bleu’ and we worked on it together.

G:
What you do is hardcore, but that work with Nicola Formichetti brings you one step from Lady Gaga. It’s crazy.

M:
Yeah. That’s exactly what I like about my life right now. I love that! It’s part of my motivation. If one day I can hang out with Rick Ross and give him a tattoo I will be proud. I’m happy when I get retweeted by DJ Paul! They’re people I looked up to. I’m 33 and I still look up to them. I’m living the dream. I don’t need to be famous or brag about what i do. My life is the reward. When my friend Zana (Bayne) has Madonna wearing one of her harnesses it makes my day!



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